Young doctors face financial and lifestyle pressures due to the misperception of wealth.

When the mother, from Buffeljagsrivier, on the outskirts of Swellendam, received the shocking news that her baby, born two months early on Christmas Eve 2015, had no genitalia, she temporarily stayed

When the mother, from Buffeljagsrivier, on the outskirts of Swellendam, received the shocking news that her baby, born two months early on Christmas Eve 2015, had no genitalia, she went temporarily “blind”. Photo: iStock

NEWS


Despite widespread belief to the contrary, physicians face many of the same financial and lifestyle pressures as everyone else. In fact, those pressures can often be much more acute for young medical professionals due to the rigorous training and work schedules they must maintain, particularly in the early years of their careers. Add to that the often significant societal and societal pressure that many young doctors experience, due to the misperception by their peers and the general public, that medical professionals must meet high standards of wealth and lifestyle.

While it is true that established doctors can earn a very good income, it usually takes many years to do so. In addition to having to pay their dues through modestly paid internships, newly qualified physicians often have tuition fees to pay as well. Only after years of private practice or specialization do most doctors reach the level of personal wealth that most people expect them to have.

READ: ‘Education and awareness are key to dealing with adolescent mental health’ – psychologist

Spread the love

What do you think?