Is competency-based education really the elixir that higher education needs to survive? |

Southern New Hampshire President Paul LeBlanc weighs in on its merits, saying a change in outcomes can drive innovation.

Is competency-based education really the elixir that higher education needs to survive? | 81 COMPETEadobestock

University leaders may have read his book”Students First: Equity, Access, and Opportunity in Higher Education” or seen bryan alexander interview with him on YouTube. Chairman Paul LeBlanc has been a leading voice in the industry, not just because of the innovative and profitable ways Southern New Hampshire University it has continued to provide education to the masses, but also because of its stern vision of its future.

Is competency-based education really the elixir that higher education needs to survive? | 83 Paul LeBlanc1

Paul LeBlanc

At the ASU-GSV Summit last week, LeBlanc again voiced her concerns in a session with College 101 CEO and Harvard Senior Professor Stig Leschly, in which she discussed why colleges and universities need to rethink how they do business, how they create content and how they need to reach more than just the top layer of students.

“I am concerned about students from lower and middle class socioeconomic backgrounds facing an uncertain future,” LeBlanc said. “They need something different, more suitable for their lives. We are leaving too many people behind. This is bad for all of us. It’s bad for us as a country.”

LeBlanc pointed to an epidemic he called “the worst Triple Crown you can have”: Nearly half of students don’t complete college; 40 million people have credits with zero degrees; and collectively, they have racked up more than $1.7 billion in loan debt. He fears that many higher education institutions have completely abandoned large student bases due to “rankings, status and mission.” But he proposes that there is a potential remedy: education based on competencies or results.

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